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Larix laricina

tamarack

Tamarack is one of only three native North American larch species and is the most common. This larch sheds its needles in the fall like baldcypress. Tamarack is the most cold-hardy of any native tree and has the strongest wood of all the conifers. Tamarack also has the widest range of all the North American conifers.

tamarack limb
courtesy of Jeffrey Brokaw at www.timberbuyer.net

Start with the Tree Finder if you are not sure what kind of tree you have!

Range Map
{Native range of tamarack)
-The native range of tamarack, USFS.

Tamarack Habitat and Culture
(silvics courtesy of Silvics Manual, USFS)

Wood Technical Fact Sheet
(courtesy of Hardwoods of North America, Forest Products Lab, USFS)

From Virginia Tech w/Photos
(Big List courtesy of VT Dendrology)

North American Timber Types
(courtesy About Forestry)

The Great American Coniferous Forest
(courtesy About Forestry)

Recent Champion: 62' height, 64' spread, 151" circumf., Coventry, Connecticut
National Register of Big Trees

Quick Stats
Common Names: Alaska larch, alerce americano, American larch, Amerikaanse lariks, amerikansk lark, amerikansk svart-gran, black larch, Eastern Canadian larch, eastern larch, epinette rouge, hackmatack, hacmack, juniper, Kanada-lark, ka-neh-tens, meleze d'Amerique, red larch, tamarac, tamarac meieze occidental

Habitat: Tamarack has one of the widest ranges of all North American conifers.

Description: a small- to medium-sized deciduous conifer extending from the Atlantic to central Alaska.

Uses: Pulp products (glassine paper), posts, poles, mine timbers, railroad ties, rough timber, fuelwood, boxes, crates and pails.

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